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Healthfirst
100 Church Street
New York, NY 10007

Want to become a Healthfirst member? Have a question about our benefits?

Contact us at:

Medicaid, Child Health Plus, and Family Health Plus
1-866-463-6743

Medicare
1-877-237-1303
TDD/TTY English
1-888-542-3821
TDD/TTY Español
1-888-867-4132
Monday-Friday, 8:30 am to 6 pm

Already a Healthfirst member? For answers to your questions, contact us at:

Medicaid, Child Health Plus, and Family Health Plus
1-866-463-6743
Monday - Friday, 8 am to 6 pm

Medicare
1-888-260-1010
TDD/TTY English
1-888-542-3821
TDD/TTY Español
1-888-867-4132
Monday - Sunday, 8 am to 8 pm

Leaf Plans
1-888-250-2220
TDD/TTY English
1-888-542-3821
TDD/TTY Español
1-888-867-4132
Monday - Friday, 8 am to 8 pm

Healthfirst Small Group and Healthy NY Small Group
1-888-260-1010
TDD/TTY English
1-888-542-3821
TDD/TTY Español
1-888-867-4132
Monday - Friday, 8 am to 8 pm


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Mental Health

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Healthy Body and Healthy Mind
Follow these simple tips to improve your brain health.

  • Exercise can actually reverse the signs of aging.
  • For an added boost, walk in the park.
  • Drink only a little alcohol, if you drink any. It’s good for your brain to not drink too much. Tip: If you like a glass of white wine with dinner, add some sparkling water to it. You’ll drink less alcohol.
  • Eating fruits such as blueberries may help sharpen your mind. Stock up on blueberries and other berries when they’re on sale (you can always freeze them). Sprinkle them over your cereal or yogurt or make them into a smoothie.
  • Keep your mind sharp by doing puzzles. Start small–carry a booklet of crossword or sudoku type puzzles when you’re riding the bus or have free time.
  • Meditation and deep breathing can help get rid of stress. Doing it regularly can help lower your stress and sometimes even your blood pressure.

Depression
Out of the Blues: How to understand and get help for your depression

  • Depression is one of the most common illnesses among seniors.
  • Up to 15 percent of people age 65 and over have depression.
  • Depression does not go away in a few days; in fact, it can last for years.
  • Your depression is not caused by aging and it can be treated.

If your doctor gives you medicine for depression, you may not start to feel better for several weeks. It is important to keep taking the medicine prescribed and return to your doctor for regular checkups every month.

  • Learn more about “Older Adults and Depression” (English  Español)

  • Lifenet is a free, confidential, multi-lingual mental health and substance abuse information, referral, and crisis hotline available to anyone at any time.  Your call will be answered by a trained behavioral health professional.

    • For assistance in English, call 1-800-543-3638.

    • For assistance in Español, call 1-877-298-3373.

    • For assistance in Mandarin/Cantonese, call 1-877-990-8585.

    • For TTY users, call 1-212-982-5284.

  • The National Suicide Prevention Lifeline is available to anyone in suicidal crisis or severe emotional distress. Your call is routed to the nearest crisis center to you. If you are feeling desperate, alone or hopeless, it’s important to call 1-800-273-TALK (1-800-273-8255).

  • NIH Senior Health Depression


Alzheimer’s/Dementia
Alzheimer’s disease is a brain disease. It slowly eats away memory and thinking skills. After some time, people with the disease can’t even do the simplest tasks. Memory problems are one of the first signs of Alzheimer’s. People may have a hard time remembering things that happened just a little while ago, or the names of people they know. Over time, symptoms often get worse. Problems can include getting lost and taking a long time to finish daily chores. As the disease goes on, people may have trouble learning new things. They may not know family and friends, and have a hard time talking.

Taking measures to stay positive and active in fighting the disease can make living with Alzheimer’s — or any chronic disease — more manageable.

If you or a loved one has been diagnosed with Alzheimer's or a related dementia, the Alzheimer's Association can provide education, referral and support.  Call their 24/7 Hotline at 1-800-272-3900 or check their website.

Below are additional resources on Alzheimer’s/Dementia: